The Culprit

whitefootedmouse

No one would think that deer have been erroneously blamed for spreading Lyme Disease, but it’s true.  The “deer tick” more correctly called the “black legged” tick is responsible for this malaise sometimes picked up from the Culprit, better known as the White Footed Mouse.  This Culprit may make a mistake  by eating his  favorite food – an acorn – that could be infected by bacteria, and thus pick up the corkscrew-shaped bacterium called Borrelia burgdorferi . 

tick-on-finger

Then the black legged tick, while in it nymph state, would need to bite the  infected little Culprit, and proceed to  launch himself onto any  unsuspecting bird, mammal, not a bat, or onto a human and bite.  Stats show the human really only has a 1.4% chance of encountering and being bitten by an infected tick.  Now if the human didn’t take proper precautions within 48 hours, that person could get sick.  So, please check yourself for ticks after going into the woods or in a shrubby area of your garden.  The Culprit does eat a number of pests in the garden – so he’s not all that bad and only lives for about a year besides. http://www.fcps.edu/islandcreekes/ecology/white-footed_mouse.htm

Upper Dublin Township’s 5 – year average of Lyme Disease reported cases is 13.4  —  Now if that number is divided by UDT population then the 13.4 cases/ 25,569 population would be a 5-year average of  0.0005 which is pretty low number.  According to the Montgomery County Health Dept., it is possible that the exposure was not in UDT but only reported by a health practitioner within the township.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s